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Monday, July 31

  1. page 13 Reasons Why in the Classroom edited ... Furthermore, “13 Reasons Why” gives an unidealized version of adult interaction in struggling …
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    Furthermore, “13 Reasons Why” gives an unidealized version of adult interaction in struggling students’ lives. When the narrator of the series, Hannah Baker, explains her predicaments prior to her suicide to the school counselor, he does not act. In the same fashion, her communications teacher receives an alarming anonymous note and she, too, does not act. Lastly, the parents in the series are flat characters who are simply blind to the cries of help from their children, and do not act. While this characterization of adults is not true for all schools, it could be read as a dramatization of what students perceive. In an announcement released by the National Association of School Psychologists (2017), they encourage educators to take the time to “reinforce that school-employed mental health professionals are available to help [and to] emphasize that the behavior of the second counselor in the series is understood by virtually all school-employed mental health professionals as inappropriate.” The article goes on to give additional guidance to educators (such as warning signs), peers, and parents to assist students in confronting these issues in a safe, healthy place. And the National Association of School Psychologists is not alone in this guidance; there are numerous states that sent out letters of caution to parents through their Department of Education (Kimble, 2017).
    While the series can be potentially dangerous to students who are susceptible to suicidal tendencies, the “series does accurately convey…that there is no single cause of suicide” (National Association of School Psychologists, 2017). The series, with the thirteen tapes and subsequently thirteen intertwining narratives, exposes a variety of concerns and issues in modern day society. Adolescents are exposed a variety of causes of depression and the importance of what silence to these issues results in. The series does not simply point a finger at one issue, or weigh one issue heavier than the other; the series does not just blame the “bullies” but also confronts those who witnessed wrongdoings and stayed silent as well. Bickmore offers a solution to the helping students' process the variety of issues and causes of depression revealed in "13 Reasons Why" by explaining that teachers need to work in close contact with school counselors to analyze and have healthy conversations about these issues. Bickmore writes that, "using critical analysis skills, we can see that Hannah Baker is a flawed character. That suicide was a poor choice. By having guidance counselors as co-teahcers of the novel, we can have real conversations about the vents depicted, which include drug use, alcohol, rumors, social media, bullying, depression, rape, and yes...suicide." Furthermore, the graphic scenes in the series are placed strategically to illustrate to the audience that these issues are real and not romanticized. Yorkey, the show’s director, explains that “the more traumatic events in the show” are present because “we felt a real responsibility not to look away from them…so where we were bold, we were only bold because the truth is powerful and sometimes difficult” (2017). The series was poised to shed light on difficult, and sometimes taboo, issues in today’s modern generation. Whether one is a critic or a supporter of the series, the series has undeniably started conversations about these issues both at home and in school. School administration, school counselors, parents, and students can now bind together to confront these issues with healthy conversations that support the students’ need to process these difficult themes.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Curriculum Proposal_LoganDimsdale.docx}
    Annotated Bibliography
    Bickmore, S. (2017, May 04). Focusing on the Wrong Things – A Defense of Jay Asher’s/Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why [Web log post]. Retrieved May 30, 2017, from http://www.yawednesday.com/blog/focusing-on-the-wrong-things-a-defense-of-jay-ashersnetflixs-13-reasons-why
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    has received.
    Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). [Graphic illustration of leading causes of death] 10 Leading Causes of Death by Age Group, United States – 2014. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/injury/images/lc-charts/leading_causes_of_death_age_group_2014_1050w760h.gif
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    United States.
    Hepburn, M. A., & ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education, B. I. (2001). Violence in Audio-Visual Media: How Educators Can Respond. ERIC Digest.
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    from adolescents.
    Highfill, S. (2017). 13 REASONS WHY: INSIDE THE MOST DARING SHOW ON TELEVISION. (cover story). Entertainment Weekly, (1466), 24-30.
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    parental anxiety.
    Kimble, M. (2017, April 26). Why Schools Are Warning Parents About Netflix's Series 13 Reasons Why. People . Retrieved May 17, 2017, from http://people.com/human-interest/schools-sending-letters-to-parents-about-13-reasons-why/
    Kimble's article gives an overview of the issues associated with the series from the point of view of parents and school administration.
    Rochlin, M. (2017, March 22). Selena Gomez (and Others) on Adapting 'Thirteen Reasons Why' on Netflix. New York Times. Retrieved May 17, 2017, from https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/22/arts/television/selena-gomez-thirteen-reasons-why-netflix.html?_r=0
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    the series.
    Schrobsdorff, S. (2017, May 11). What It Feels Like When All Your Parental Nightmares Are Rolled Into One TV Series. Time. Retrieved May 17, 2017, from http://time.com/4775444/13-reasons-why-parental-nightmares/
    Schrobsdorff's article focuses on the issues the series creates for parents and highlights concerns from critics such as the portrayal of depression in the series.
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  2. page Nature Vs. Nurture and Education's Sunken Place edited ... In My Opinion In my opinion, nurturing in education is essential to a student's learning proc…
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    In My Opinion
    In my opinion, nurturing in education is essential to a student's learning process. The public school model that I have seen does not work well because it does not cater to what students need to be successful. In the public school model there are far too many students in one classroom. The number of students per class inevitably causes the teacher not to be able to give close individualized attention to everyone in the class. Also, assessment can become overwhelming. Assessment becomes a daunting task when there are 160 to 180 assessments to grade. I personally believe the private school models that Canada and Clark have created are education Utopias. In each of these settings they have created institutions that meet the needs of their students consistently and produce results. The main attribute that each of these educators stress in their learning environment is care and nurture for the students. Canada credits everything that he has done for his students to the fact that he likes kids and wants them to succeed. Clark says the same about his students. In comparison, I believe the Harlem Children's Zone and the Ron Clark Academy are outperforming many of the public schools across the nation. If it were possible, I would fully support using their methods as a standard for all schools in the nation because I believe every student deserves what their students are receiving on a daily basis. The current public school model we have is not consistently performing as a whole and this needs to be changed. The nurturing aspect of private schools through their small classroom sizes, student and teacher care benefits, and differentiated instruction is the best plan we have for all of our students to be successful.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Proposal_Printup.docx}
    References
    1. Urie Bronfenbrenner, "Ecological Systems Theory," in R. Vasta (ed.), Annals of Child Development, vol. 6 (Greenwich, CT: JAI Press, 1989): 187 - 251.
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  3. page The Complexity of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy edited ... CRP is a morally and philosophically sound approach. It says to students: “You are a human. Yo…
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    CRP is a morally and philosophically sound approach. It says to students: “You are a human. You have inherent and intrinsic value. So, your culture does too. In this classroom we recognize you and your culture. We see you. You are someone.” If that were not enough motivation for the inclusion of CRP—which it is—research proves that CRP increases student achievement.
    CRP is such a topic of morality that it should be handled with severe seriousness. An educator that deliberately neglects a child’s identity should be immediately removed from his or her position. An educator that inadvertently disregards a child’s identity should be immediately alerted to their mistake and provided with tools for changing their pedagogy. If the educator refuses or cannot change, he or she should be immediately removed from their position.
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    worth having.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Curriculum Proposal_Overby.docx}

    Annotated Bibliography
    [175]untitled Oil On Canvas 53.2 X 45.6 Cm 201. (n.d.). Retrieved June 01, 2017, from http://shinkwangho.deviantart.com/art/175-untitled-Oil-On-Canvas-53-2-X-45-6-Cm-201-399743980
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  4. page Someone Should Care - I'll Get Right on That edited ... With all of this in mind, it cannot be overlooked that the apathy seen in so many students acr…
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    With all of this in mind, it cannot be overlooked that the apathy seen in so many students across our nation could very well have authentic roots. Students “are afraid to fail, have troubled home lives, [and] experience peer pressure” (Condron). Others, however, simply have realized that they can get by with doing the bare minimum. There are hundreds of reasons why the kids in schools do not care. And yet, there is something that can be done about it. There are schools all over the nation taking on student apathy and changing the entire perspective of education for both teachers and students. One such place exists right here in Georgia: the Ron Clark Academy. This middle school, situated in Southeast Atlanta, was established in 2007, a mere decade ago, and yet has already been recognized both nationally and internationally for “success in educating students with academic rigor, passion, and creativity balanced by a strict code of discipline” (The Ron Clark Academy). These students are not only being engaged and enjoying the content they are learning, but the rigor and discipline and behavior expectations remain the same if not much higher than that of the public schools in America today. This type of educational institution, this attitude toward students and their learning, this expectation for students to behave and exceed goals, this motivation embodied by students to do their very best is what is needed in all public schools in America, and it is possible.
    Overcoming student apathy is no easy feat. It requires a comprehensive equation where teachers, parents, students, administrators, and even the community come together to embody the same perspective and attitude toward educating students. When this happens, when differences can be set aside and attitudes can be changed, student apathy can be overcome and can be converted into the success that teachers, parents, students, administrators, and members of the community all desire and deserve.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {currculum proposal_Workman.docx}
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    Annotated Bibliography
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  5. page Effective and Equitable - Is Math Homework Hurting Student Achievement edited ... Homework shouldn’t just focus on same-day-content. Homework should be used as an opportunity t…
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    Homework shouldn’t just focus on same-day-content. Homework should be used as an opportunity to practice old content and prepare for upcoming content as well (Cooper, 2001). Students need to be held accountable for completing their work correctly. As such, homework should be graded for accuracy along with completion, with an opportunity for students to correct or revise their work (Woolfolk, 2016). Homework should focus on reinforcing conceptual understanding more than mathematical procedures. This can be done by assigning reflection questions or other assignments than require students to think more deeply about the content. These will increase the quality of homework, but that still leaves the issue of equity. Since not all students have access to the same resources, no assignments should require the use of technology (i.e., computers, graphing calculators, internet, etc.). Further, to allow those living in a less stable environment an opportunity to complete their work, assignments should be short. High school students can work between approximately 90-150 minutes before homework begins to have a diminishing return (Denisco, 2013). Not all students have this much time to devote to work. A student living in a hectic household will be more able to complete an assignment that takes 20 minutes as opposed to an hour.
    The debate on homework will not be ending anytime soon. Many schools still include homework as part of their policy, much tom the dismay of the parents. Yet, even with more schools adopting a no-homework policy, they too are met with resistance from parents and educators. For all the research that says that homework is effective, there are just as many studies that say they are. There are no clear answers or solutions when it comes to homework. Therefore, it is the responsibility of any educator who uses homework to make sure homework it is effective and equitable by taking the aforementioned steps.
    References: To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Proposal_Barnes_D.docx}
    References:

    Boaler, J. (2016). Mathematical mindsets: Unleashing students’ potential through creative math, inspiring messages and innovative teaching. (1st edition). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. This book provides research, data and experiences from the author in regards to understanding and improving math education.
    Cooper, H. (2001). The battle over homework: Common ground for administrators, teachers, and parents. (2nd edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc. This book provides research and data in regards to understanding and improving math homework.
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  6. page Charter Schools' Impact on Student Success edited ... On the other hand, another article from U.S. News and World Report mentions that among cities …
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    On the other hand, another article from U.S. News and World Report mentions that among cities tested by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, D.C. has the fastest improving charters. They mentioned that D.C. charter students gained the equivalent of 72 days of extra learning per year in reading and 101 in math, compared to traditional public students. Research findings that are consistent with these findings include Hoxby and his colleagues (2009) that show that upper elementary grades students outperformed similar grade students that were in traditional public schools. Another study conducted by Hoxby and Rockoff (2005) found that students enrolled in the Chicago charter schools performed better in reading than their public-school counterparts.
    I personally am a proponent of public schools. However, as charter schools continue to shape educational policy, whether I teach at a public or charter school, I have a responsibility to do all I can today to help prepare our youth for the future.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Paris_D_TrendsProposalFinal.docx}
    ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    1. Cowen, J.M., & Winters, M.A. (2013). “Choosing Charters: Who Leaves Public School as an Alternative Sector Expands?” Journal of Education Finance, 38(3), pp. 210‐229.
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  7. page Credit Recovery edited Credit Recovery Overview ... Currently, the responsibility lies largely with the school dist…

    Credit Recovery
    Overview
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    Currently, the responsibility lies largely with the school districts in what guidelines they set for their credit recovery options (Center for Public Education, 2012). These districts are being pressured by state and national accountability programs to improve graduation rates, which are seen as an indicator of a successful school system. This pressure can encourage the adoption of credit recovery programs that are not rigorous. There are similar pressures on the teachers who have regular classes during the school year. However, there are accountability programs in place for regular classroom teachers. Specifically, there are programs that hold teachers and schools responsible for their students’ standardized test scores For all their shortcomings, standardized tests can introduce a level of accountability for schools that could otherwise give up on students, not by failing them, but by passing them. What accountability is there for low quality credit recovery programs, what standard can credit recovery be held to?
    The question of how to regulate credit recovery is subsumed by the question of how to regulate education in general. This broader issue involves our society as a whole, and whether we choose to treat education as a formality, a piece of paper which we give to those willing to put in the time, effort, or money, or as a meaningful standard which we hold ourselves to in how we think and how we teach our children to think.
    To read a proposal focused on this wiki's topic, please download this document: {Harney_J_Credit Recovery Proposal.doc}
    Bibliography
    This page provides an overview of credit recovery in the United States, how it works, and the issues involved.
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